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Student Engagement Activities and the Challenges of Teaching Off and Online

Panelists - Mark Kinzer, Jamie Young, Marcy Wells, & Lindsey Williams

Podcast Summary

In this week's conversations, our panelists shared their ideas for increasing student engagement, as well as explored the challenges of teaching both off and online.

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audio transcript

After Hours: Conversations for Music Educators

Season 1: Episode 1

Student Engagement Activities and the Challenges of Teaching Off and Online

NICK AVERWATER:

all right good afternoon everyone looks

00:05

like we've got some people flowing in

00:07

here that's fabulous we're gonna get

00:09

started here in just about 60 seconds

00:12

we're really excited to have you on for

00:14

our very first after-hours conversations

00:17

to help directors thrive in the COVID-19

00:20

era so again we're gonna get started

00:22

here and just about 45 seconds now so

00:25

come on in if you have any questions you

00:27

want to ask feel free to go ahead and

00:28

throw them over there on the chat bar so

00:31

we can ensure that we spend a little bit

00:32

of extra time on those particular

00:34

questions tonight so very good welcome

00:39

everybody welcome welcome let's see who

00:52

all we have we have a good group in here

00:54

too mr. Andrew Lynn fabulous one of our

00:57

panelists for next week looking forward

01:00

to having more familiar faces mr. Trobe

01:03

all mr. Helme Brooke good to see you

01:05

guys some Arkansas people looks like we

01:09

have the Brunner's and everybody man

01:11

what a great group looking forward to

01:13

kicking off these conversations here's

01:17

Jay McCauley another Middle Tennessee

01:19

guy up there from Mark’s neck of the

01:20

woods

01:21

and look at everybody coming in here we

01:26

got six renditions...Keith Sanders is in here

01:28

six times that's pretty impressive Keith

01:30

well how you did the head okay fabulous

01:35

we're gonna go ahead and get started I

01:37

know we are still working with one of

01:39

our panelists and Jamie if you're on

01:41

here we're gonna try to get you in as

01:42

quickly as we can but I think we're

01:44

gonna go ahead and get started it's 5:03

01:46

and we're really excited to kick off

01:48

today's conversation so welcome everyone

01:51

to After Hours conversations to help

01:55

directors thrive in the köppen 19 era

01:57

each week Tuesdays at 5 p.m. we're going

02:00

to be looking at a different topic and

02:01

pulling them apart with an expert panel

02:03

that's going to help us talk about what

02:05

they're doing in their classrooms how

02:07

they're solving some of today's problems

02:09

so again today we're going to be talking

02:11

about student activities

02:13

challenges of teaching on and offline it

02:15

looks like Jamie just joined us I'm sure

02:17

her audio is getting going so welcome

02:18

Jamie I'm so my name is Nick Averwater

02:21

I'll be the moderator and I'm here at

02:22

hammering music in Memphis again if you

02:25

have any questions feel free to throw

02:26

them hey Jamie glad you made it

02:31

welcome if you have any questions feel

02:34

free to throw them over on the chat bar

02:36

so we can spend a little bit of time

02:37

doing that but on that note we're going

02:39

to go ahead and get kicked off I want to

02:41

introduce all of our panelists so

02:42

panelists if you don't mind

02:44

Mark I'm going to let you kick us off

02:46

because you're in the top left of my

02:47

screen tell us who you are where you're

02:49

from what you do and we have so much

02:51

negativity in the world if you could

02:53

give us two quick sentences on something

02:56

that is either encouraged or warmed your

02:57

heart since all of this has started so

03:00

we can just start on a positive note

03:01

that would be awesome

03:02

so mark over to here

 

MARK KINZER:

all right first of

03:04

all thanks for hosting this camera music

03:06

and Nick we appreciate it very much my

03:09

name is Mark Kinser I am the fan

03:11

director at Fairview High School I have

03:13

been teaching for 32 years now

03:16

and I've enjoyed every moment of it it's

03:18

been great

03:19

this is certainly a you could say a

03:22

challenging time but I look at this is

03:24

an opportunity time for us and the time

03:26

of hope and I'm seeing a lot of that in

03:29

our community here in Fairview and also

03:31

with our kids we do a service once a

03:35

month for some other early folks out

03:36

here who do not have access to food and

03:39

things like that and our kids have

03:40

continued that mission with great works

03:43

delivering food once a month to this

03:45

early people and then I've also had the

03:47

ability to pass and students have sent

03:50

me some really great compositions and

03:52

things that they've been writing and

03:53

working with so I think our message of

03:56

taking opportunity are taking crisis and

03:58

turn it into opportunity which creates

04:00

hope has really benefit us out here

04:03

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NICK AVERWATER:

awesome thanks mark

04:05

all right Marcy we'll turn that over to

04:07

you how are things in Arkansas

 

 

 

MARCY WELLS:

hi my

04:10

name is Marcy wells I teach in

04:12

Greenbrier Arkansas which is about an

04:15

hour north of Little Rock I help with

04:18

high school bands teach ap music theory

04:21

direct the ninth grade band and teach a

04:23

couple classes of homogeneous beginner

04:26

so

04:27

that's what we do I think probably one

04:30

of my favorite experiences has been

04:32

seeing a couple of kids log into Google

04:35

classrooms who don't give me a lot in

04:39

the classroom

04:40

normally at school you know and then all

04:42

of a sudden here they are when I didn't

04:44

expect it and you can see from the look

04:46

on their face that they're just so glad

04:49

to have some interaction with another

04:50

adult and be a part of something and be

04:53

included and and it's the best part of

04:56

their day sometimes so that's been my

04:57

favorite part of it that's awesome

 

NICK AVERWATER:

Thank

05:00

You Marcy let's see how are things in

05:02

Kentucky

05:03

 

LINDSEY WILLIAMS:

thanks they're good in Kentucky my name

05:06

is Lindsey Williams I'm excited to be

05:08

here with you guys tonight

05:09

I teach at Paducah middle school which

05:12

is in the Paducah City School District

05:14

in Paducah Kentucky here in Western

05:17

Kentucky McCracken County and I have a

05:21

split sixth grade we have I'm divided by

05:24

family so I have a sixth grade woodwind

05:26

percussion class sixth grade brass same

05:29

with seventh grade band and then an

05:30

eighth grade concert band and I do a

05:32

string orchestra class as well so we do

05:35

jazz band outside of the school day

05:37

which I know the kids are really missing

05:38

but I've been teaching for fifteen years

05:40

in in Paducah Middle School and the

05:44

thing that's really warmed my heart is

05:46

the parents connecting with the students

05:49

I've noticed some of the students are

05:50

really independent and video themselves

05:52

playing songs but what's fun is the

05:55

parents who are videoing their child

05:58

practicing maybe when the student

06:00

doesn't know that they're doing them and

06:03

it's it's really it's sweet to see that

06:05

and to see some of the students sending

06:07

these songs that they normally that I

06:09

normally wouldn't get to hear them play

06:11

so I think they're having a lot of fun

06:13

connecting by playing their instrument

06:15

is something positive a positive

06:17

activity to do during the day and it's

06:20

really been fun to see that that's

06:22

awesome

06:23

 

NICK AVERWATER:

Thank You Lindsey and Jamie our

06:25

Mississippi Representative how are you

06:28

 

JAMIE YOUNG:

I'm great thank you so much my name is

06:31

Jamie young and I teach at Lake Cormant

06:34

High School in DeSoto County and I teach

06:38

high school band

06:39

gentle music collects and a

06:42

dual-enrollment music appreciation and I

06:45

have two teenagers here right now with

06:47

me who are also band students so they

06:49

may be playing for you later we'll see a

06:55

couple of things that have really pulled

06:57

at my heartstrings the first thing is

07:00

I've had a number of kids that have

07:02

reached out to other students to kind of

07:04

help them get plugged into what we're

07:06

doing online and make sure they're on

07:08

top of everything and and they have

07:10

their assignments so they're really

07:12

sharing you know the knowledge that they

07:13

have and then the other thing was an

07:16

assignment that I gave like right as

07:18

like the first week after we got out

07:21

where the students were asked to teach

07:23

their parents a song on their instrument

07:26

so they had to teach their parents how

07:27

to play like mary had a little lamb and

07:29

what was really great about that was it

07:32

was it was hilarious but it also gave

07:36

the parents an opportunity to understand

07:38

and see what their child goes through to

07:41

learn to play an instrument that you

07:43

know there is a difficulty involved and

07:44

they really appreciate it a lot more and

07:47

then it also gave the parent and the

07:49

child a chance to connect through music

07:51

so that was a lot of fun watching those

07:54

videos and then one other thing that's

07:57

happened that was really neat was some a

07:59

couple of the schools put parades

08:01

together

08:02

of teachers who went around in cars

08:04

parading through neighborhoods you know

08:06

waving at their students and and kind of

08:08

getting them pumped up and excited about

08:10

you know seeing him again so that was

08:13

that was really sweet –

 

NICK AVERWATER:

that's awesome

08:16

thank you Jamie and I love that activity

08:18

teaching your parent how to play how

08:20

much fun is that and so that that's what

08:22

really cool engaging activity I suspect

08:24

we're going to circle back around to

08:25

that one so thank you all it's no

08:28

accident we've got people representing

08:30

both middle school and high school band

08:32

and orchestra for different states we

08:34

wanted as diverse of a panel as we could

08:36

because we know everybody state is

08:38

different everybody's district is

08:40

different how they're handling this so I

08:42

think this is great because we're gonna

08:43

have such a unique widespread

08:45

perspective on facing these challenges

08:47

today so let's talk and turn our

08:50

attention to keeping students engaged

08:52

Marcy I'm going to lead off with you

08:54

what are some of the activities that

08:56

you're doing to keep your students

08:57

engaged and what's working and maybe

08:59

what's not working with your students

 

MARCY WELLS:

we

09:03

are a big Google classroom school so

09:06

we've been doing a lot of stuffs are

09:08

there and we've been encouraged from our

09:10

district to use Google Hangouts because

09:13

it's easy to save and I want us to

09:15

record all of our videos and post them

09:17

so a lot of that I've been doing a

09:19

couple different kinds of meetings with

09:21

my kids I really like what I call just

09:24

check-in meeting we don't really have an

09:26

agenda and I don't need their

09:27

instruments I made you a couple of

09:29

announcements but mostly we just kind of

09:31

visit and catch up and I usually plan

09:33

for those to be about 10 or 15 minutes

09:35

and have to keep the kids off at the end

09:37

of it because they all want to talk they

09:39

miss each other that they miss just

09:41

being a part of that so those are fun

09:43

all of our staff have split up the

09:47

instruments based on the beginning once

09:48

we teach and so I do the clarinet and

09:51

the French horn so I've set up separate

09:54

Google classrooms to work 6 through 8

09:56

clarinets together 6 or 8 horn also 9

10:01

through 12 clarinets and 9 through 12

10:03

horns so we've been kind of doing our

10:05

instruction that way and we can focus on

10:07

tone and some basics and scales and

10:10

instrument specific kind of stuff that

10:13

we can't always get to I created a

10:16

silent genius form and have been doing

10:18

someone on I have offered one-on-one

10:20

private lessons to some of my students I

10:23

can squeeze in like two or three a day

10:24

and they just sign it up if they're

10:26

interested in math we're working on

10:29

creating a virtual soul and ensemble

10:31

where they can choose a solo especially

10:33

for our younger kids and send us a

10:35

recording and we will email them a

10:38

certificate and feedback we've also been

10:42

searching the internet for everything we

10:44

can find it's pop and fun and posting

10:47

all that in the Google classroom just to

10:49

give them more stuff to play we have

10:52

used smart music from a director

10:54

perspective in our classrooms but not

10:56

really push that up to students and so

10:58

I've done several videos helping them

11:00

get signed up for the free smart music

11:02

Subscription

 

NICK AVERWATER:

that's awesome Marcye thank

11:05

you so much we have

11:06

question here from Keith so you're using

11:08

Google classrooms both individually for

11:11

some one-on-one conversations but also

11:12

group conversations as Google classrooms

11:15

been able to accommodate your entire

11:17

class and your entire group so far

 

MARCY WELLS:

well

11:19

they don't also up but I think the

11:21

limits on Google classroom are 250 ok oh

11:24

that's a pretty solid number

 

NICK AVERWATER:

yeah

11:27

absolutely fabulous great question Keith

11:29

thank you

11:29

okay Lindsey how about you you've got a

11:32

lot of young people that you're working

11:34

with in paducah what are you using to

11:36

keep them engaged

 

 

 

 

 

LINDSEY WILLIAMS:

I think the thing that

11:39

I want to do impress upon everybody from

11:42

the very beginning of all this was it

11:44

the most important thing besides you

11:47

know self care and and well-being is

11:50

that everybody needs to keep playing and

11:53

so even you know try not to put a lot of

11:56

pressure on them about what to play even

11:58

though I have given assignments as these

12:00

weeks have gone on and keep it

12:02

structured but the very first priority

12:05

for me for my middle schooler 6th 7th

12:07

and 8th grade is to keep the horn out

12:10

every day at least five days a week you

12:12

know and make sure that you're playing

12:14

every day and so doing a good warm-up

12:18

just keeping those basic routines that

12:20

we had instilled in them so well I'll

12:22

school you're in place and just sending

12:24

out a gentle reminder you know maybe

12:26

every day or every other day we're not

12:28

on Google classroom we're on Microsoft

12:30

teams and our school district and so

12:34

does sending a message out that way and

12:36

also through parent emails and some

12:39

texting to the people who aren't on team

12:41

saying don't forget to warm up to my

12:44

string orchestra students we've done a

12:46

lot of different I've done some video

12:49

lessons not where we've been together

12:50

but things that I can send out that say

12:53

don't forget to tune before you play

12:55

every time because if you're not tuning

12:58

your practice time is going to be a

12:59

waste of your time and even though we

13:02

seem to have a lot of time right now in

13:04

our hands we don't want your time to be

13:06

wasted so I think that number one thing

13:09

is reach out to us if you need us but

13:11

then don't forget to play

13:14

don't leave your horn in the case every

13:15

day

13:16

make sure your playing and I have worked

13:18

some things out where you know if

13:20

there's an instrument that's broken and

13:22

it's a dire situation and we worked out

13:25

a way to pick that up and and try to get

13:28

that into the shop somehow haven't had

13:30

too many of those yet but I didn't

13:31

anticipate that we would have some

13:33

problems with instrument repair but Rhys

13:36

has made that really seamless so so just

13:40

trying to remind them to play and keep

13:42

them engaged in that way encouraging

13:44

them to play things that they enjoy and

13:47

also challenging some of those students

13:49

that are self-starters and just saying

13:51

here's a list of songs that you know

13:53

these are playing tests that we were

13:55

going to do this quarter here's the you

13:57

know the whole list of check off songs

13:59

and and some one student sent me all 13

14:04

songs in one day she was really the

14:06

flute player of course very

14:09

conscientious but but you know just

14:13

encouraging students on all levels to

14:16

say keep playing every day

 

NICK AVERWATER:

yeah awesome

14:19

thank you Lindsey

14:20

so mark let's turn our attention to you

14:22

you and Jamie both teach at the high

14:24

school level and so let's talk a little

14:26

bit about keeping those high school

14:27

students engaged and what activities

14:29

you're doing to accomplish that

 

MARK KINZER:

oh here

14:32

in Williamson County what we did was we

14:34

put together learning resources at all

14:36

three levels I had some people to help

14:40

me do the high school band portion and

14:42

what we tried to do was hit in different

14:44

areas to keep the kids engaged we did a

14:47

music theory area we did a performance

14:49

area we did a listening and analysis

14:53

area history composition and then

14:55

leadership and co-curricular and what

14:57

we're doing is pushing out suggestions

14:59

of things that students can do to stay

15:02

actively engaged in the music making

15:04

process we all know that that process of

15:07

making music can not be replicated but

15:10

we're trying that push as much

15:12

information out there to them as

15:13

possible to keep them engaged and keep

15:16

them playing one thing I've done with

15:18

with my students personally is I've

15:20

taken ten families each day just to call

15:23

and check in on them not about band but

15:25

just about their personal well-being and

15:28

making sure that their I've got the

15:30

things they need we're pushing things

15:32

out through Google classroom and we're

15:34

using the screencastify to make videos

15:37

and things like that that we can push

15:40

out through the district resources as

15:42

well as our own schools

 

 

NICK AVERWATER:

yeah awesome

15:44

fabulous Mark I love how y'all have

15:47

broken this up into different learning

15:49

segments approaching things like

15:52

leadership and and ensuring that it's a

15:54

well-rounded curriculum and that we're

15:57

taking advantage of this time to not

15:58

just talk about music but other things

16:00

that are important to our success

16:02

so that's fabulous and Jamie how about

16:05

for you at Lake Cormorant again working

16:08

with a lot of high school students how

16:10

are you keeping them engaged

 

JAMIE YOUNG:

so we do a

16:14

number of things very similar to what

16:16

Mark is doing by making sure we're

16:18

targeting certain areas of practice and

16:21

preparation one of the things that I

16:25

really try to do with my students is try

16:28

to get as many involved in whatever

16:31

social media or media platform resource

16:34

that we are using and I know that you

16:37

know some students like using this some

16:39

students like using this so I've just

16:41

really diversified the platforms that

16:44

we're using so the hub of everything

16:46

that we teach is from our teacher web

16:49

page so we put our lesson plans on there

16:53

all of the connect the connecting things

16:56

that we were doing can be found there so

16:58

that's the first place we tell them to

16:59

start I also communicate with them

17:03

through remind101 and school status and

17:06

school status is actually part of our

17:07

district too we also use the Microsoft

17:11

teams and they can find those links on

17:13

our web page click on that link and join

17:15

the class that they're a part of and

17:18

through this program I'm able to

17:19

communicate with the students through

17:21

messages and set up online meetings to

17:24

discuss progress or who might need

17:26

assistance and accessing you know all of

17:29

the the different apps were using or the

17:31

different lessons that we're asking them

17:33

to do this also allows my students to

17:37

connect with each other which is really

17:39

good they can find some kind of normalcy

17:40

and respect everything that's

17:42

right now one of the ways that I've

17:45

tried to motivate them and get them

17:46

involved is by giving hints and clues to

17:50

our next year's marching show so I'll

17:53

give them riddles once a week and they

17:54

have to figure that out and then

17:56

actually this week is the reveal week so

17:58

for the four weeks I've had a number of

18:00

students that just want to be on there

18:02

so they can find out what the show is

18:03

going to be so just trying to find

18:05

motivational tactics you used to get

18:06

them on there and I think once I get

18:08

them on there I can get them going with

18:10

all the assignments I also have files of

18:12

the assignments downloaded on there I

18:14

use a form once a week for the kids and

18:17

this was kind of this was implemented

18:18

before all of this happened happened

18:21

it's called deep practice and it kind of

18:23

gives them a written instructional guide

18:26

on how to practice which includes

18:28

listening and sight reading and tonal

18:31

aspects warm-ups working on solos they

18:35

fill that out once a week through Google

18:37

Docs and then send that in to me and of

18:40

course through that they can use sight

18:41

reading factory or I'll give them

18:44

different areas they can get site

18:45

reading materials from we also use smart

18:49

music and I'm using that specifically

18:52

with my Wind Ensemble because that was

18:53

implemented before but I know smart

18:55

music is offering it free to to all

18:58

students right now so that's a really

19:01

good platform to use it's not quite as

19:03

user-friendly as some but but if it was

19:07

set up you know if you if you have a way

19:08

to easily set that up with them I think

19:10

it would really serve as an advantage to

19:13

get them involved with a lot of

19:15

different kinds of music I've started a

19:18

program with them it's called breezing

19:20

through theory and this has been a great

19:23

program I just absolutely love it it's

19:25

also free right now to the students and

19:27

it's um it assesses the students

19:30

knowledge on music theory and also their

19:33

prior musical knowledge it's been a

19:35

great way to address music theory

19:37

practices that I haven't been able to

19:39

address in class and I plan on

19:41

continuing to use that when we get back

19:43

to school next year it's a very

19:45

interactive approach that I can

19:47

customize for my individual classes and

19:50

I'm also using that for my general music

19:52

classes as well and

19:54

it also has a reward system set up to

19:56

help motivate the students so they can

19:58

take ownership in their into their

20:00

individual success and then I can look

20:04

at the data as statistics on which

20:06

students are involved and what they're

20:08

doing and again is totally free and it's

20:11

a way to collect data on the students

20:13

and know what they're doing currently I

20:15

have a hundred and about a hundred

20:18

students in high school band I have 58

20:19

students enrolled in this and they've

20:21

already completed those 58 about 1,300

20:25

assignments so so that's you know that's

20:28

not everybody but that's over fifty

20:30

percent of the students that are

20:31

involved in that that's awesome I use I

20:34

use flipgrid also and that's an

20:36

interactive app that allows me to get

20:39

video assignments that I that I may

20:42

assign to them like right now they have

20:45

to they have a skill set one a skill set

20:48

to the skill set three and then some of

20:50

the music that we were working on before

20:53

you know this happened so they they make

20:56

videos of themselves performing this has

20:58

been a great tool for us because when

21:01

they pass off the scales they do it

21:03

blindfolded or with their eyes closed so

21:05

I can use it as an actual audition for

21:08

next year's chair placements or you know

21:09

even to be in the high school band and

21:12

you can also with flipgrid and it's free

21:15

also you can you can make some fun

21:17

activities on there like we did one

21:19

where they had to make a video and talk

21:21

about what their favorite apps were and

21:23

then we did the video where they were

21:25

teaching their parent you know the song

21:27

which was which was really fun

21:30

my percussion instructor and one of our

21:33

sister directors Christopher Jordan he

21:35

uses it's called OneNote and he creates

21:38

one or two sign assignments per week for

21:40

students and that involves music theory

21:43

or history and performance and self

21:46

assessment and if you're on any of the

21:48

online teacher band director Facebook

21:51

pages and mr. Jordan is using this is

21:54

called band bingo which is an assignment

21:56

that he can give to the students each

21:58

day and then using YouTube also as a way

22:02

to access documents and videos the

22:05

current thing that we're trying

22:06

right now and I'm I'm really liking it a

22:08

lot as discord and as I was saying

22:11

earlier I have a 17 year old son who was

22:14

talking to me about it and he was like

22:16

hey mom there are a lot of kids that are

22:18

on this program this would be a good way

22:20

to reach out to the band students so we

22:22

set up a page and from that page we're

22:24

able to set up like different sections

22:26

and do text channels and voice channels

22:30

the only thing about that is you have to

22:33

be very careful what the students are

22:34

discussing and talking on there and make

22:36

sure they have guidelines for

22:37

appropriate use but we've been able to

22:39

reach out to all a lot of students that

22:41

way I didn't realize how many kids are

22:43

actually using discord so that's been a

22:45

really cool thing and they the kids like

22:48

using that platform so again I'm just

22:51

trying to find as many ways different

22:53

ways possible that I can brief each as

22:55

many students as possible so that's kind

22:58

of what we're doing

 

NICK AVERWATER:

awesome thank you

22:59

Jamie yeah you're definitely casting

23:01

this wide net and trying to engage as

23:03

many students and when we got a comment

23:05

you know Ben Pemrooke also says he's

23:07

using breezing through theory I've never

23:09

heard of this with his middle school and

23:11

his students have completed nearly 500

23:14

drills and assignments as well so he's

23:16

endorsing it from middle school so

23:17

that's great information as well so

23:19

thank you Jamie thank you everyone man I

23:21

think we just ripped through about a

23:22

dozen different apps and different

23:24

content ideas and ways to keep student

23:27

engaged so that's awesome now on the

23:29

other side of that coin and I know this

23:31

is a conversation that we really need to

23:33

spend some time on but we have to

23:35

recognize that that not everyone has

23:37

access to high-speed Internet or to the

23:39

technology that they need to accomplish

23:41

these assignments let's spend a little

23:43

bit of time pulling that apart so mark

23:46

I'm going to kick off with you because I

23:48

know you mentioned you're from a pretty

23:49

rural area and so what are you doing to

23:53

engage your students that don't have

23:54

access to technology and high-speed

23:56

Internet

MARK KINZER:

so Nick one of the first things

23:59

we discovered at Fairview high school was

24:01

that when parents started losing their

24:04

jobs and being laid off the internet was

24:06

the first thing to go and that was

24:08

...

24:17

 

NICK AVERWATER:

you there mark am i the only one that lost

24:20

mark me there you are you are you

24:25

getting me yeah yeah you start with

24:27

first thing you realize

 

MARK KINZER:

when you came to

24:29

Fairview High School was high school the

24:36

first thing we discovered was that the

24:39

internet was the first thing that

24:40

parents were cutting when they lost jobs

24:42

or were laid off for things like that so

24:44

what we've been doing is sitting at the

24:46

Chromebooks the Khajiit along with those

24:49

and providing those hot spots for

24:51

students so they could do that the other

24:53

thing we did was we put together paper

24:55

packets and things that we could get to

24:58

the students but they could use in place

25:00

of a computer

 

NICK AVERWATER:

okay are they tell me a

25:04

little bit more about the Chromebooks in

25:06

the hotspots I mean I'm familiar with

25:07

them on the business side or there's

25:09

something that's provided by the

25:10

district or for those students that

25:12

don't have that how are you able to

25:14

acquire them for them

 

MARK KINZER:

well the district had

25:16

some and in our school had stone and

25:18

basically what they do is they plug in

25:21

the wall and just provide that student

25:22

with a hotspot that will link with their

25:24

Google Chromebook

 

NICK AVERWATER:

okay

25:26

fabulous awesome thank you mark Marcy

25:29

how about for you in Arkansas the

25:31

students that don't have internet what

25:32

are you doing

 

MARCY WELLS:

um we're doing a lot of

25:36

same things and we have a paper package

25:38

and I have practice records and lists of

25:40

things but one of the things that I

25:41

started doing this week is driving all

25:45

my students a personal letter and

25:46

they're real short they're real simple

25:49

and they're not even really about band

25:50

they just say hey I wouldn't you know

25:52

that I'm thinking about you and I miss

25:55

our class where we could all get

25:56

together and I hope that they're doing

25:58

okay so that's one thing I've done just

26:01

to kind of reach out personally

 

NICK AVERWATER:

yeah I

26:03

love that idea

26:05

because I have to imagine we have

26:06

students right now who are missing their

26:08

friends their teachers and they're

26:10

pretty lonely and so I love the way that

26:12

you're connecting the human element with

26:15

music and encourage them to continue to

26:17

participate and I have to think it's

26:19

going to impact your retention as well

26:21

the student so that that's really great

26:23

Lindsey how about for you what are you

26:25

doing for students that don't have

26:27

internet

26:28

 

LINDSEY WILLIAMS:

a pretty big percentage of our student

26:31

population opted out of the online thing

26:33

or good guess they don't have access to

26:36

internet or they would just prefer the

26:37

paper packet and at this point for my

26:41

ensemble classes which is all that I

26:43

teach all day I haven't really sent out

26:46

any worksheets or any paperwork to go

26:48

with those paper packets that have been

26:50

delivered so I've just been doing

26:52

everything I can to reach out to the

26:54

kids as far as our teams but I'm not

26:58

getting more than maybe 20 or 25 percent

27:00

response rate on teams online so the

27:03

email does seem to reach a lot of

27:05

parents and the other thing I've

27:09

discovered it is even when I do connect

27:11

with the students on teams my middle

27:13

school student parents they don't see

27:15

what their child is doing on teams

27:16

necessarily so reaching that parent

27:19

audience has been really important I

27:22

realized that more and more as we've

27:23

gone along so I've tried to email

27:25

parents lists of the assignments for

27:28

this quarter as far as playing tesco and

27:30

then we've discovered just sending

27:34

sending videos and has been taking a

27:37

long time so we've kind of opted to do

27:40

some audio for the people they can

27:42

upload video but even there there's

27:44

students that don't have their parents

27:45

don't have a smartphone or they don't

27:47

have their own smartphone and so I've

27:49

just been trying to to call or to text

27:52

and just reach out and say hey you know

27:55

what's the best way that I can connect

27:57

with you and anytime I've had a chance

27:59

to send somebody music that maybe left

28:02

their their band folder or their

28:03

Orchestra folder at school and so I've

28:05

been getting parents saying oh we don't

28:07

want this song or we don't have this

28:09

packet to work on with this band book

28:10

method book anytime I mail something

28:13

I've kind of been doing what Marcy is

28:15

doing just including a little personal

28:17

note it says hey whatever you need let

28:20

me know

28:20

and and we're here for you whether we

28:23

have to make a phone call or a text or

28:25

you know a home visit and keeping that

28:29

six foot distance when we go by and I've

28:31

dropped off some bras into my string

28:34

students and knock on the door and then

28:37

step way back so they say keep a full

28:40

trombone slide lengths away from people

28:43

of six feet so I was a trombone player I

28:45

can visualize okay this is how far back

28:48

I need to be from the door then they

28:50

feel a lot more comfortable to come

28:52

outside

28:53

everybody is desperate for human

28:55

interaction right now anytime I've

28:58

delivered rosin or slide oil or made a

29:00

home visit that it's not been a short

29:03

visit because everybody wants to talk

29:05

Lindsey have you had any have yet any

29:08

working with the publishing companies

29:10

because they've been really good about

29:12

letting us use materials that we've

29:14

bought and doing PDFs and things for the

29:17

students I have heard that they'll do a

29:19

lot more free stuff but I haven't had

29:22

any I haven't reached out or done

29:24

anything with that personally but I need

29:26

to keep that in mind

 

NICK AVERWATER:

yeah that's great

29:29

more has anybody else any of our other

29:30

panelists worked with publishers or had

29:33

success and having them loosen their

29:35

guidelines to distribute music yeah it's

29:41

good feedback thanks mark I appreciate

29:42

that

29:43

in Lindsey I love one of the things that

29:45

you pointed out that we probably

29:46

shouldn't overlook is that for these

29:49

students that might be left behind

29:51

because they don't have opportunities to

29:54

communicate through more streamlined

29:56

message messaging platforms is that when

29:59

you reach out to them it sounds like

30:00

you're uncovering other problems that

30:03

might be preventing them from

30:04

participating in music and it's giving

30:07

you that opportunity like delivering

30:08

rosin or the packets or just having

30:11

these conversations so you're uncovering

30:13

other things to that that are creating

30:16

obstacles from your child or from the

30:18

child participating in music so I really

30:21

I love that suggestion Jamie how about

30:24

for you how are you handling students

30:27

without high speed internet

 

JAMIE YOUNG:

we are also

30:30

making the teacher packets and and they

30:33

include two weeks of lesson plans or two

30:36

weeks of assignments the kids can pick

30:39

those up at school and then they deliver

30:40

them back to the school and that's that

30:43

I think that's reaching a lot of the

30:45

students that we're not big we're not

30:47

being able to reach online however if I

30:50

find that you know we're not reaching

30:51

them that way then I I'd you know

30:54

go through whatever means possible to

30:55

reach that student call them using our

30:59

school status we have access to the

31:00

parents numbers emergency numbers and

31:03

just call them to try to find out what

31:06

we can do to accommodate you know their

31:09

kids so they can you know be part of

31:11

what's going on you know a lot of the

31:14

students at the high school level I

31:16

think do have smartphones and so I try

31:19

to adapt the lesson so they will that so

31:23

they can be used on their smartphones

31:25

the only one that really can is smart

31:27

music but all of the other ones are

31:30

easily accessible from their smartphones

31:32

it's I'm sure it's a lot different at

31:34

the middle school level but at the high

31:36

school most of them do have phones so

31:39

again I think it's important to just

31:41

reach out to the individual students if

31:43

you haven't been able to you know get in

31:45

contact with them to call their parents

31:47

to call them to just find out what you

31:49

can do to get that information to them

31:52

and like Lindsey was saying you know

31:54

I've made a couple of house calls to we

31:56

had to go and restring a horn so you

31:59

know you do what you got to do to get

32:00

these kids playing and they're their

32:02

instruments working and and and I think

32:05

all of that is really important in it

32:07

and it shows them that that you really

32:09

care about them too and that and it's a

32:11

lot more than just teaching a lesson you

32:13

know it's it's trying to accommodate a

32:15

lot of their needs so that's what we do

32:18

 

NICK AVERWATER:

that's famous fabulous thank you jamie

32:21

so Marcy what let's let's come back to

32:24

you so we've talked about the high speed

32:26

internet and certainly that's a huge

32:28

obstacle

32:28

what are some other obstacles that you

32:31

might be facing through either teaching

32:35

online or in the COVID-19 era how are you

32:37

overcoming some of those obstacles

 

MARCY WELLS:

i'm

32:40

something i think that's really a loaded

32:42

question i think that we're gonna feel

32:46

the repercussions of this in so many

32:48

ways for years to come so i think that

32:50

you know we don't really know how

32:53

effective what we're doing it i know

32:55

Lindsey said earlier that she gets in

32:57

her best classes 20% participation and

33:01

mine is probably about there or lower

33:02

depending on the class I have run across

33:06

just a lot of

33:08

odd things in teaching online that I

33:10

wasn't used to you don't realize how

33:13

dependent on feedback we are until you

33:15

play through a scale three times with

33:17

your kids and at the end you have no

33:19

idea if they can play it or not because

33:21

they're all muted and you can't hear and

33:23

so that's been real different for me too

33:26

to just stay with the process and not

33:29

have that feedback I'm also having to

33:32

alter my wait time with kids when I'm

33:34

teaching because they won't jump in

33:37

online and talk like they will in the

33:39

classroom and sometimes I think it may

33:41

even be an Internet delay so as a

33:44

teacher when it's silent I just want to

33:46

talk and want to fill that that void and

33:49

keep that going and I've had to be

33:51

really aware and just be quiet and wait

33:54

you know sometimes if you wait 30

33:55

seconds and they'll eventually start

33:57

answering you and then it's not

33:59

something I have to do in my classroom

34:00

usually

 

NICK AVERWATER:

yeah that's great Thank You

34:03

Marcy Lindsey how about for you are

34:05

there other challenges that that you're

34:07

finding different from teaching in the

34:08

classroom to now or and how are you

34:10

addressing these

 

LINDSEY WILLIAMS:

I can't remember what I

34:13

was watching a show the other day and

34:15

somebody said that we have to forgive

34:16

ourselves and I think that all the

34:19

self-inflicted pressure trying to teach

34:21

the same way we have to try to do

34:23

everything a lot differently to reach as

34:26

many kids as we can and to be as

34:28

effective as we can from this distance

34:30

learning but I also had to forgive

34:32

myself and take some of that pressure

34:34

off and realize that that I'm doing the

34:37

best that I can all the teachers are

34:39

doing the best that they can the

34:41

students and the parents are doing the

34:44

best that they can and so we have to be

34:46

patient and I mean some parents are

34:50

working some parents are home teaching I

34:53

saw a parent yesterday she came out and

34:56

said oh I've been teaching my second

34:58

grader about the solar system and and I

35:01

just think everybody's trying to find

35:04

the best way to make this work and so

35:06

just trying to take some of that

35:09

pressure off and say okay even though I

35:11

didn't get everything done I'm going to

35:13

do this today I try to look back at it

35:16

and go okay who did I reach today that

35:18

maybe I hadn't heard

35:19

yet or who achieved a plane test better

35:23

because of some little feedback that I

35:26

gave them in a text or a note the other

35:28

day so it's trying to find the positive

35:32

and and stay positive it feels like

35:34

we've all been on an emotional roller

35:35

coaster since this started or at least I

35:38

know that that I have and so I think

35:41

we're all getting really creative and

35:43

trying to overcome these obstacles and

35:46

just do what we can with the time that

35:50

we have

 

NICK AVERWATER:

and that's such a great thing

35:53

for us to keep in perspective that we

35:55

have to give ourselves the opportunity

35:57

to recognize that this is different on

35:59

us too and that's okay we can overcome

36:02

this and it's going to take time so I

36:03

love that you recognize that Lindsey

36:05

that that it's okay to give ourselves

36:07

the opportunity to learn and to be

36:10

vulnerable and to do all of those things

36:12

that's great thank you

36:14

Jamie how about for you what surprised

36:18

you or what obstacles encountered

 

JAMIE YOUNG:

one of

36:22

the things that my kids have had a

36:25

problem with is just making sure that

36:27

they have all the correct information

36:29

and not getting confused about what

36:32

they're supposed to be doing this is

36:34

kind of happened more with my dual

36:36

enrollment classes because their

36:38

workload is a lot more than what what

36:41

I'm giving like my general music class

36:43

but you know having that foundational

36:47

webpage to go to and say okay go here

36:51

first and you know and look under your

36:53

class and that's exactly what you have

36:56

to do and when it's due so they they're

36:59

not confused about that anymore I think

37:01

you know when they start having that

37:03

confusions like what am I supposed to do

37:04

when is this due because you know when

37:06

they're getting all of this information

37:07

from so many different teachers it does

37:10

get confusing and a little overwhelming

37:13

not just for the students but also for

37:15

the parents so being able to keep them

37:17

on task motivated and focused on what

37:21

the assignment is at hand instead of

37:24

thinking about all of the multitudes of

37:26

different things they're having to do I

37:29

think helps a lot and then I also kind

37:31

of rape mine based on

37:32

percentage you know I don't want to give

37:34

them as much work as I normally do

37:37

during this school year so I cut it at

37:40

least in half maybe even a little bit

37:41

more and give them a lot more time to to

37:44

get assignments done but even so they

37:48

still you know they still struggle with

37:51

being off task and not motivated and I'm

37:55

you know I find myself being that way as

37:57

well so again I think you know it's

37:59

crucial that you have that communication

38:01

with the students or the parents so you

38:03

can help overcome those types of

38:06

obstacles

 

NICK AVERWATER:

Thanks Jamie and how about for you

38:10

mark anything that you might add to this

38:12

conversation

 

MARK KINZER:

well I think that the

38:15

biggest thing we find out and we talked

38:17

about this as a faculty yesterday is so

38:20

many families are depending on their

38:22

kids to take care of the younger

38:24

siblings kids have been farmed out to

38:28

other places and may not have the

38:30

resources with them they need to

38:32

complete assignments and things that we

38:35

give them the other thing is trying to

38:39

get that student who is only motivated

38:42

by grades to be motivated to do

38:44

something here in Tennessee we can't

38:47

require anything be done as an

38:51

assignment here so we're looking at

38:52

alternative ways of trying to create

38:54

motivation with those kids and keep them

38:57

engaged

 

NICK AVERWATER:

yeah it's a great and just out

39:03

of curiosity have you found a way that

39:05

has been effective for those students

39:07

that are only motivated by grades I mean

39:09

I think we could make that a topic in

39:11

and of itself to talk about student

39:14

motivation what have you found to be

39:15

successful

 

MARK KINZER:

well I keep hearing that 20%

39:19

number and I think that's something I've

39:21

heard just across the nation and talking

39:23

to people that they're running into

39:25

about 20% of their students that are

39:27

actually responding I have found that

39:31

most of my students are responding to

39:33

text messages and and phone calls and

39:36

things like that better than anything

39:38

hmm

 

NICK AVERWATER:

yeah okay that's perfect well and

39:43

that's a great lead-in to our next

39:44

conversation we

39:45

which is communication I also want to

39:48

share Robin

39:50

one of our attendees here shared some

39:52

great insight she says the availability

39:56

is internet Internet is spotty in her

39:58

area but YouTube seems to get much

40:01

better reception and download speeds

40:04

than Google classroom so she's using a

40:06

lot of YouTube in areas where there's

40:09

poor cell phone reception so that's

40:12

interesting Robin thanks for the the

40:13

information and feedback there for those

40:16

people that might be encountering slow

40:18

download speeds on Google classroom

40:21

might give YouTube a try so thanks for

40:23

sharing that with everyone so let's flip

40:25

over and talk about communication

40:27

because again we've got 20% of the

40:29

students it sounds like they're engaged

40:30

they're checking their Google classroom

40:32

or their email whatever it is what has

40:34

been the most effective way for you to

40:37

communicate with your students thus far

40:40

so mark why don't you lead us off

 

MARK KINZER:

well I

40:44

think the first way has been through the

40:46

Google classroom and then secondly I

40:48

have a text in agreement with all of my

40:50

high school band students so I'm able to

40:53

reach out to them through text I'm also

40:54

calling families I'm trying to make it

40:56

an effort to call 10 families each day

40:59

and just check in on them I think one

41:01

thing we have to remember is that for

41:04

some students school is their safe

41:06

environment and home may not necessarily

41:08

be the safe environment and for lack of

41:12

a better term they've been quarantined

41:13

into this unsafe environment so I think

41:15

it's important that we communicate with

41:18

them and let them know that we're still

41:19

thinking about them during this time

41:20

 

NICK AVERWATER:

yeah that's great so so mark you're

41:23

really utilizing the text message in it

41:25

I mean with high school students I

41:26

assume that's a pretty common way that

41:28

they communicates that you might as well

41:30

do the same they turned in that check

41:32

email

 

MARK KINZER:

you know emails is foreign to them

41:35

they're more into dis net chat Instagram

41:38

and tik toks and things like that huh

41:41

okay that's interesting sometimes I feel

41:44

like adults do the same but that might

41:45

be a different topic so we'll keep

41:47

moving on that one so Lindsey how about

41:48

you you're dealing with a lot of young

41:51

kids and so they may or may not have a

41:53

smartphone may or may not have a cell

41:55

phone

41:55

how are you interacting with these

41:57

students and communicating with them

41:58

effectively

42:00

 

LINDSEY WILLIAMS:

a couple of different ways we had to

42:01

have set up through the school and so

42:03

the Microsoft teams classroom is

42:05

obviously the first platform that we use

42:07

but with such a low percentage I do have

42:11

a mass parent email list because I I do

42:13

I don't email middle schoolers but I

42:16

have found that I can connect with some

42:18

of their parents through email but again

42:21

a lot of adults are not using that or

42:22

they don't check it very often so we

42:25

have something called Kimbo which I'm

42:27

sure there's many different forms of

42:29

that like remind where it's set up there

42:32

my classroom my class rosters where I

42:35

can send a very short message which is

42:38

difficult to do but it's like a text or

42:41

it goes to their the parents preferred

42:44

method whether that's their smartphone

42:45

or their email that little short message

42:48

will get to them so something I've been

42:50

doing to kind of piggyback on email is

42:52

if I send out a really important email

42:54

with a lot of information then I'll send

42:57

a Kimbo message and say hey did you get

43:01

my email and let me know if you didn't

43:03

because it's really important we

43:05

actually did a fundraiser

43:06

earlier this month or in March and it's

43:10

coming in Thursday so we're having to

43:12

kind of navigate some uncharted

43:15

territory with that so I did let the

43:17

people that sell popcorn know we're

43:20

gonna space that out or going to social

43:21

distance and here's how you can pick up

43:23

your popcorn and so that's been an

43:26

interesting challenge this week as far

43:29

as planning that kind of event in

43:31

coordinating the popcorn pickup this

43:34

Friday and Monday but I do I try to

43:37

touch all those bases do the team's

43:39

classroom to connect with the students

43:41

that we are connecting with on their

43:43

email the parents and send a Kimbo as a

43:46

backup to say hey did you get the email

43:48

or do you need me to send this a

43:49

different way and then the last resort

43:52

for me is the texting I do have a

43:54

handful of students that that's the only

43:57

way that they can send me their playing

44:00

tests or just fun videos of things that

44:03

they're working on at home some of them

44:06

in learning new movie music or video

44:08

game songs or don't say here on the

44:10

radio or on TV and so so do

44:14

the texting to the parents that don't

44:16

have maybe they don't have internet

44:18

connection or a computer or a tablet but

44:21

they have that smartphone in hand and

44:23

then the last thing is is kind of come

44:26

up recently realizing that not everybody

44:29

has a phone not everybody has internet

44:31

he is sending out I kind of an

44:33

old-school newsletter my dad was a

44:36

preacher and so we used to fold those

44:39

little church newsletters and send them

44:40

out every month or every week and I

44:42

thought this is one way that I'm gonna

44:44

get to those kids who are getting those

44:46

paper packets well I'm not giving middle

44:49

school band and orchestra assignments on

44:51

paper necessarily but I can send them a

44:54

little shout-out hey we're thinking

44:57

about you we miss you here's a list of

44:58

stuff you can be playing for fun and

45:00

then a list of stuff that you can play

45:02

for grades and and doing a mailer kind

45:06

of a newsletter that way so trying to

45:09

throw that net like Jamie Jamie had a

45:12

lot of different ways to reach her high

45:13

school kids and we're just trying to do

45:15

that same thing here

 

NICK AVERWATER:

yeah that's

45:17

fabulous Thank You Lindsey would that be

45:20

something that you would be willing to

45:21

share after for other directors that

45:24

might be looking for some inspiration on

45:25

how to connect with those if we emailed

45:27

it around to the attendee

 

LINDSEY WILLIAMS:

yes yeah that

45:30

would be awesome

 

NICK AVERWATER:

I'd love to compile

45:32

some of these resources into an email

45:34

and share it with the people who are

45:36

participating today so that they can

45:38

just looked at what you're doing and

45:40

find some inspiration and of course if

45:43

they can you know use what's already

45:45

been done successfully

 

LINDSEY WILLIAMS:

I think everything

45:47

I'm doing I've stolen from

45:48

somebody else

 

NICK AVERWATER:

 yeah that's exactly

 

LINDSEY WILLIAMS:

you don’t have to re-invent the

45:52

wheel here

 

NICK AVERWATER:

yeah yeah that's exactly

45:55

right thank you so much and then Jamie

45:56

how about for you anything any different

45:59

communication methods and what we've

46:00

already discussed

 

JAMIE YOUNG:

well we're using the

46:05

school status which is adopted by our

46:07

school district and that has all of the

46:09

parent contacts in it with that and

46:12

remind101 I can send broadcast out to

46:14

all the parents and all the students

46:17

which is a really good way to

46:18

communicate one of the things that was

46:21

concerning to me was how am I going to

46:23

communicate with the incoming freshmen

46:25

because I actually I don't teach at the

46:27

middle school

46:28

so I'm you know exclusively at the high

46:30

schools I don't have that interaction

46:32

with the middle school so I needed to

46:35

find a way to make sure you know these

46:36

kids are going to be in band next year

46:38

and how can I get them keyed into what

46:42

we're doing so one of the best ways I've

46:45

found to get in touch with them is

46:47

through other students like our current

46:51

freshmen know most of those incoming

46:53

freshmen so the ones that I haven't been

46:55

able to get in touch with they've gotten

46:57

in touch with them for me given them you

46:59

know my contact information so they

47:01

could get with me and then we could set

47:03

up that communication with them so and

47:06

that's worked really well like we have

47:08

43 incoming freshmen and I've been able

47:10

to get in touch with all of them but

47:12

about nine students so that's worked

47:15

Really

 

NICK AVERWATER:

 well it's very cool Jamie and a

47:17

great way to communicate through that so

47:20

good input I also shared this here we've

47:22

got a comment from an attendee Chandler

47:24

Webber with a great idea Google Voice

47:26

provides an anonymous phone number for

47:29

free for anyone who doesn't use

47:31

remind101

47:32

or similar program so that's a great way

47:35

if you don't want to give out your

47:36

personal cell phone number that you can

47:38

create kind of a ghost number and still

47:41

receive text messages and phone calls so

47:43

Chandler great input thank you so much

47:46

so we've got about 10 more minutes here

47:48

before we approach the hour mark and I

47:50

want to talk a little bit about

47:52

expectations how are you balancing the

47:56

expectations and incorporating musical

47:59

development with everything else that's

48:01

going on right now we've talked about

48:03

students might be acting as babysitter's

48:05

or being called to do these other

48:07

responsibilities and how are you

48:09

striking the balance of expectation

48:11

musicality and then keep it in in

48:13

perspective of what's going on from the

48:16

bigger picture so Marcy how about you

48:18

what are your thoughts on that

 

MARCY WELLS:

um my

48:22

district has done a really good job of

48:23

communicating that we want to meet the

48:26

kids physical needs we want to meet

48:28

their emotional needs and then will will

48:31

try to at least maintain educationally

48:33

if there's nothing else we can do and I

48:36

think just realizing that goes a long

48:37

way my number one goal is to keep my

48:41

kids playing

48:42

if they'll just put the instrument up to

48:44

their face that's my number one goal but

48:46

probably my number two goal is to be a

48:49

resource for the kids who want to do

48:52

more because you know there are those

48:54

kids teacher kids and and and kids who

48:57

come from an educated family who are

49:00

really going to make the most of this

49:02

time and really going to use it and so

49:04

that's why I've been doing some

49:06

one-on-one private lessons through sign

49:08

up genius and Google hangout and

49:11

structuring some all-region and scales

49:14

and tone and instrument specific things

49:17

to help the kids who want to make the

49:19

most of this time really push and

49:21

achieve while not requiring that of

49:23

everybody and still trying to keep it

49:25

light and fun and and just something to

49:28

keep on playing

 

NICK AVERWATER:

I love that Marcye so

49:31

you're you're really allowing the

49:32

students to set the pace and then you're

49:34

trying to meet them where they are based

49:37

on their particular environment that's

49:39

great great input Jamie how about for

49:42

you how are you balancing expectations

49:45

and maybe the students reality

 

JAMIE YOUNG:

one of

49:50

the things that I really try to do is

49:52

understand my students on an individual

49:55

basis and what their individual needs

49:56

are in in comparison to what the the

50:03

whole group needs are so you know I I do

50:06

the assignments on flip bread and I do

50:09

the other assignments with that musical

50:11

development in mind I want to make sure

50:13

that it's addressing their personal

50:15

performance their their theory practice

50:19

and their practice habits and I think

50:21

that's one thing this deep practice

50:24

forum does is it it really targets the

50:26

individual student and again you know it

50:28

gives them a weekly on what they need to

50:31

do during their individual practice

50:33

session and keeps it structured so they

50:35

can address the things that they think

50:37

they need improvement on and within that

50:39

practice forum they also have a video or

50:44

make a video of themselves so they can

50:45

go back and then evaluate you know what

50:47

they are doing so I think it's you know

50:49

again I think it's very important that

50:51

we keep you know that in mind when

50:53

giving this on it's makes

50:55

sure it is addressing their individual

50:56

needs as well as you know the whole

50:59

group needs one of the things I've

51:01

informed my students of in regards to

51:03

the whole group needs is that their

51:05

skill sets that they're doing are part

51:08

of their audition for next year's high

51:11

school bands so you know they can they

51:14

can video that performance and make it

51:16

as good as they want to or just kind of

51:18

you know just do it it's kind of up to

51:20

them but it depends on what they want to

51:22

do individually and the same thing with

51:24

the breezing through theory they can

51:26

submit an assignment when they make a

51:28

100 on it or they can submit it when you

51:31

know it's an 80 so it's about individual

51:33

motivation and them taking ownership and

51:35

what they are doing as far as their own

51:37

performance

 

NICK AVERWATER:

yeah that's great

51:39

when Jamie let me ask you a question - I

51:42

have heard you use the word deep

51:44

practicing a couple of times if somebody

51:46

is looking for more resources or more

51:49

information about what exactly that is

51:51

and how to incorporate it into their

51:52

program where would you send them if

51:55

 

JAMIE YOUNG:

anybody it's just a form that I practice

51:58

form up made up individually for my

52:00

students so if anybody wants to I'll be

52:01

more than happy to send them a copy of

52:04

it what we're using and explain it I

52:06

have a PowerPoint that goes with it but

52:09

it basically is a set of instructions

52:11

that they that they go by during their

52:14

practice session and they have to write

52:16

down what they're doing like it starts

52:18

off with what are you what new piece are

52:22

you playing this week or how did you

52:24

develop the ideas that you had last week

52:26

what are you doing in regards to sight

52:28

reading you know when you listen to

52:30

yourself the form what did you hear find

52:33

a professional musician that plays your

52:36

instrument or some kind of professional

52:37

performance and give feedback on it so

52:39

they don't just look at the questions

52:42

they have to really think about what

52:43

their answers are and and write those

52:45

down and I think that's really important

52:47

for getting that stick so you know again

52:50

if anybody wants to copy more than happy

52:52

to share it with them

 

NICK AVERWATER:

yeah thank you so

52:54

much

52:54

what I love about that though is that

52:56

you're bringing clear objectives into

52:58

the practice session about what are we

53:00

hoping to accomplish with somebody

53:02

talked about using our time effectively

53:04

even though I think Lindsey said even

53:06

though we have a lot of time right now

53:07

we still got to use it

53:08

and not waste it and that's what I love

53:10

about Jamie's method here is that it it

53:12

brings clarity so what am I going to get

53:14

out of this practice session today so

53:16

that's really good Jamie and so will

53:18

share that with all of the attendees as

53:21

well and then I had a question here from

53:23

Anthony I think it might be to you Jamie

53:25

what was the name of the music theory

53:27

program that you're using that case

53:29

track of the progress was that breezing

53:31

through Theory

 

JAMIE YOUNG:

Breezinthrutheory.com and

53:36

they have it right now where you all the

53:39

kids can sign up for free and they said

53:42

they would continue to do that while all

53:44

of this is going on now after that after

53:47

that time here it is up you have to

53:48

purchase the program but I believe

53:50

they're going to continue that through

53:52

July but it is a really really good

53:54

program and like I said you can you can

53:56

accommodate for your curriculum like if

53:59

you the very first part of it is based

54:01

on staff the staff and note name so you

54:05

have the choice of giving them an

54:07

assignment based on treble clef bass

54:10

clef alto clef or tenor clef so you can

54:13

you can target what you think your

54:15

students need to know and that's with

54:17

each of the chapters so it's it's a

54:19

great program

54:20

 

NICK AVERWATER:

awesome thank you jamie mark how about

54:23

for you anything that you might add

54:25

working with high school students

 

MARK KINZER:

you

54:29

know just to kind of think about that

54:31

practice sheet one of the things we did

54:33

this year was we developed a sheet that

54:35

was individual last for each student

54:38

because the practice is not as much

54:41

about how much time you're putting in

54:42

but the quality of time that you're

54:44

putting in so it is it's a very detailed

54:46

sheet allow students to individualize

54:48

their practice and I think during this

54:50

time I know here for some of my students

54:53

I'm not there every day to monitor that

54:55

now so they're really having to use that

54:57

as a means to accomplish the goals that

55:00

they're they're wanting to accomplish

55:02

and be ready for next year

 

NICK AVERWATER:

yeah yeah

55:06

awesome thanks mark and Lindsey anything

55:09

you might have

 

LINDSEY WILLIAMS:

 as far as expectations I

55:12

mean I think that we just have to have

55:13

our priorities straight some of these

55:15

kids have bigger fish to fry than then

55:18

doing all the assignments that I'm

55:20

putting out but then there are some kids

55:21

that need those assignments to fill

55:23

structure and to feel good you know and

55:26

have something to do during the day so

55:28

the number one thing is just self-care

55:30

making sure you know telling the kids to

55:33

take advantage of any kind of food you

55:36

know delivery that our school districts

55:37

are doing makes making sure they're

55:40

taking care of themselves not staying up

55:42

till 4:00 a.m. every night playing fort

55:44

night getting some sleep and I found out

55:48

the first day that this started and then

55:51

also last night as this is stretched on

55:54

but I have several students that are out

55:56

of state as soon as this happened some

55:59

of my students their parents sent them

56:01

to their grandparents to stay and they

56:04

didn't take their instrument with them

56:05

for whatever reason and last night I had

56:07

a student reach out to me and say oh I

56:09

don't have my clarinet I've been in

56:11

Mississippi for this whole duration

56:14

babysitting my sister's toddlers and you

56:18

know I'm trying to keep up with what

56:20

you're posting on teens but I don't have

56:23

my horn just to hang in there and so you

56:25

just have to be forgiving and say okay

56:27

well when you do get your instrument

56:29

back or when you do come back home back

56:30

to Kentucky or you need to try to go

56:34

through and work through some of these

56:35

skills so that you're not behind next

56:37

year but once you get that instrument in

56:39

your hands start playing it again just

56:42

start from scratch

56:43

do your warm-up routines and keep it

56:46

going as soon as you can so so some some

56:50

different kind of individual situations

56:52

of kids that want to play but maybe

56:54

their family have put them in a

56:55

situation or they don't they don't have

56:57

their instrument with them I did have a

56:59

parent that drove to deliver their son's

57:01

tuba but it was like three or three or

57:05

four weeks in so he just now got it but

57:08

he's he's starting to catch up a little

57:10

bit so just letting them know that that

57:13

they can work at their own pace is seems

57:16

to take a lot of the pressure off some

57:17

of the kids who are really worried and

57:20

panicked and their parents are worried

57:21

about their grades because we are giving

57:23

grades in in Kentucky at least in our

57:25

school districts they didn't really want

57:27

us to introduce any new content since

57:30

March 13th or whenever this

57:33

started but they do they are allowing

57:35

the teachers to give some some pretty

57:38

low-key grades to keep the students

57:40

motivated and give some feedback to the

57:43

parents as well

 

NICK AVERWATER:

lindseyawesome you know that's

57:45

great input something we definitely have

57:47

to keep in mind and all of this Lindsey

57:49

so well we are right at six o'clock on

57:52

the dot here so first to our panelists

57:54

thank you you all were wonderful I just

57:57

completely inspired by the way you all

57:59

are tackling and addressing these

58:01

problems we're all figuring this out

58:02

together all of us are and I just love

58:05

the vigor in which you all have

58:06

approached these and trying to keep kids

58:08

with instruments on their faces but also

58:10

balancing the reality of what we're

58:12

doing and facing today so will

58:14

congregate all of these resources into

58:17

one place and we'll distribute it out as

58:19

well with the professional development

58:20

letters so you can be looking for an

58:22

email to all of our registrants for that

58:26

also next week we're going to be talking

58:29

about student recruiting I know a lot of

58:31

schools two of our states on this call

58:32

have already announced that we're not

58:34

going to be back in session or back in

58:36

the building's for the remainder of this

58:39

academic year so let's talk about how

58:41

we're going to recruit without a

58:42

classroom and that's going to be next

58:43

week's conversation you will need to

58:45

re-register this zoom link will not

58:48

allow you to access next week's

58:50

conversation so if you're wanting to be

58:52

a part of that and I hope you are be

58:54

sure that you sign up and we'll be

58:56

sending out an email and advertising

58:58

that on our Facebook page here within

59:00

the next couple of days so again to all

59:02

of our panelists Bravo to all of our

59:03

educators thank you for what you're

59:05

doing everybody stay safe and have a

59:07

wonderful wonderful evening

 

 

Resources

Deep Practice Form

Professional Development Attendance Letter

Posted by Amro Music at 4:40 PM
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